Books to promote STEAM ideas with kids

This year has gotten off to a rocketing start –  I have been working on my PhD and getting back into the swing of my working year. Over the December holidays I also launched my new site: My WISE Dolls. This site aims to curate and share resources to support children(7-15) to up-cycle dolls to make “Working In STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) Enterprise” Dolls. I have made under and up-cycled one doll: Mini Fi, the science teacher:) The next one I will do is a Computer programmer doll for my Son.

Being a science teacher, I really want to promote opportunities for all children to access an understanding of what STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) careers/interests can be. One aspect of this is though books, and I have been amassing a small collection of books that claim to address aspects of STEAM for this age group.  The blog posts over the next few months on mypaperlessphd will be short reviews of these books.

The first book I will review is Nick and Tesla’s High Voltage Danger Lab by “Science Bob” Pflugfelder and Steve Hockensmith. wp-1455419545895.jpgThis book would suit children aged 9-12 years old, and has an interesting mystery storyline that keeps the pages turning. There are accessible activities for children to replicate- with assistance from their Adult at times.  The story is made up of one part real science, one part mystery, one part adventure and one part MacGyver! The children in the story, twins Nick and Tesla are sent to stay with their Uncle for the summer. Their adventure starts right at the airport, and we get a sense that these two are very resourceful characters. As the first book in the series it gives closure on the first mystery, and sets up for a longer story line that will unfold over the coming books.

Here is the blurb from the website:

“Nick and Tesla are bright 11-year-old siblings with a knack for science, electronics, and getting into trouble. When their parents mysteriously vanish, they’re sent to live with their Uncle Newt, a brilliant inventor.

But it’s not long before Nick and Tesla are embarking on adventures of their own—and engineering all kinds of outrageous contraptions to save their skin.

In Nick and Tesla’s High-Voltage Danger Lab, we meet the characters and learn how to make everything from rocket launchers and burglar alarms to mobile tracking devices and more. Science has never been so dangerous—or so much fun!”

To read an excerpt pop over to the webpage: http://nickandtesla.com/book-1-high-voltage-danger-lab/.  This book can be read alone by children, but would be a lovely one to read aloud together too. It is also available as an audio book. As the main characters are a boy and a girl, this is a book promoting that science is accessible to everyone. I recommend it highly, and have just ordered the next in the series:)

I wonder if you have a STEAM book you would like to review- or would like me to review. Please let me know through the comments below, or through the facebook page.

Until next time

Fiona T

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Tinker tailor: up-cycling, problem solving and learning

This past week I was lucky enough to be able to run a ‘maker movement’ workshop with my students (who are adults training to be teachers:) ). My inspiration came from the following sources, as indicated below in my blurb for the workshop:

The maker movement is gathering traction in the US and internationally: https://www.techopedia.com/definition/28408/maker-movement. It recognises the need to have young people explore technology by taking it apart, finding out how it works and redesigning the technology to make some thing new. There are strong Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM) links here that we can harness in schools, either as part of formal curriculum, or as an extension/engagement opportunity. We will be deconstructing McDonalds toys (which can’t go to landfill) and up-cycling them to make artistic posters OR redesigning them to make a new toy/item- It is up to you. Examples: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/art-news/7675915/Artist-builds-sculptures-from-circuit-boards.htmlhttp://www.sodapopgirl.net/art/disassembly/ and http://www.toddmclellan.com/commercial#5 .

The purpose of the workshop was for them to experience first hand the wide educational potential of an open ended invitation to up-cycle some old McDonald’s toys. Why McDonald’s toys? When my son, Little Tacker (LT) was younger we would have McDonald’s as a semi-regular treat, and very quickly accrued a pile of plastic single purpose toys. When he was about 5 I cleared out his room and found we had heaps, and the problem became how to dispose of them. The toys are plastic and often have batteries in them, meaning we can’t put them into the plastic recycling bins or landfill. So I finally had an opportunity to use them with a class and see how creative we could be.

Unfortunately many of these toys have (what I now know to be) Security screws that need a specialist triangular bit to undo them….and I had bought a few sets of small Phillip’s head and flat head screw drivers for my students to use- Whoops! Fortunately this was only a hiccup for a short time in the workshop and my students were able to problem solve and figure out different ways of opening the toys and re-purposing them. Below are some pictures of the ‘end products’.

Inside a clock work smurfThis was a clockwork Smurf toy- it ‘laid down’ and rotated on a ball attached to it’s feet and would intermittently turn to balance on it’s elbows, then go back to rotating on the ball. After much perseverance the student with this toy was able to break away part of the body and remove the cogs that performed the motion.  The two cogs had different arrangements of teeth which gave rise to the ‘intermittent’ movements we observed int he working toy. This lead to a small group discussion about one of the earliest forms of programming being the Jacquard Loom. A very interesting discussion that created curiosity and a few email discussions after the session too. Inside a pop up toy smurf

This student had a ‘pop-up’ present Smurf, and was able to reassemble her toy as a 3D item to display the inner workings.

Up cycled mobile

This student made a ‘superhero mobile’ – pictured flying over Melbourne :) Upcycled ringA couple of students up-cycled their toys into Jewellery- Ninja Turtle rings anyone?

This workshop was great fun and highlighted an opportunity to engage students in a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) experience. It also created a high level of cognitive engagement and curiosity in the group- me included! I have now found the screw drivers we need on ebay – so will source some before I run this workshop again next year. I would like to thank my students for agreeing to let me use photos of their creations and share their stories here too.

Until next time- happy tinkering.

Fiona T

 

 

 

 

 

Neural Knitworks- the maker movement and crowd sourcing meets Science week

This year I have embraced Neural Knitworks again, and with a more timely introduction for my students we have had a good response this year. Today I finished hanging our display in our Science Foyer, and am excited to share this with you. Thanks to the students and staff who contributed- one learning to crochet to participate! If you would like to see what is happening on a bigger scale, or participate- here is a link to the Neural Knitworks site- and it’s call to crowd sourced making to improve our understanding and skills:)

2015-08-21 11 36 02 neural knitwork wall

This kind of hands on project and modelling of Biology can be a welcome invitation for teachers and students alike to develop new skills and contribute to a community project. There are no-knit options too, so there are differentiated entry points for anyone willing to give it a try.  Oh- and it is fun too!

Until next time, happy crafting and making.

Fiona T

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 6.1) More on Goldiblox

A quick update for you all:

Lately I have been thinking more and more about STEM (Science technology Engineering and Math) promotion in schools and homes with our Children. While researching STEM and girls education for an upcoming workshop I found reference to the Goldiblox game and the now growing company promoting a wider range of toys for children to explore STEM ideas in fun ways. I was really pleased to see expansion packs too, that could be paired with any of the games to provide the much needed extension I thought was lacking in the first game.  Here is a link to the store: http://www.goldieblox.com/ and a link to my original blog about the first toy in the series.   I wonder if you have any STEM toys/games you think are a valuable part of your classroom/home? Please feel free to share them in the comments below.

Until next time

Fiona T

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Healing blade- a biology card game.

This story started in 2011, when I first read about the “Healing blade card game” From Nerdcore in this blog: https://drottematic.wordpress.com/2011/08/11/review-healing-blade-the-infectious-disease-card-battle/.    I began to search for this game, knowing it would probably be too advanced for the VCE (Victorian Certificate of Education- Year 12) course I wanted to use it for. Healing blade was developed for Medical students to use as a learning tool- and this is what intrigued me the most, the information within this game wouldn’t be “dumbed down” or incorrect. To me, accuracy is a very important aspect of any game I would want to use as a learning tool.

Unfortunately, the game had a small initial print run and it took me quite a while to find out about the kickstarter movement and track down the print and play version. Late last year I received the newest version of the downloadable file. I was impressed with the quality of the card fronts and really wanted to print these out on card stock for my classes to work with. The months flew by, and the printing of the cards was pushed on down the priority list. Then the sudden realisation that I need the cards for my class this week hit me! So, I have compromised and printed out my card set on a normal photocopy paper. I spent a couple of hours yesterday cutting up the paper cards and backs and sliding them into plastic card holders (Thanks MindGames on Swanston St for your help in sizing the right ones).

Sometimes the work of teaching is ‘making’ the resources:)

Healing blade pic for blog

Now the game is ready to play.

Along with 6 other Biology based games, Healing blade will be considered by my students this week, and critiqued as a possible classroom tool.

I hope, in the coming weeks, that I will blog about our impressions of each of the 7 games we will critique, so stay tuned:) (or link the RSS feed to your email, so you don’t miss out!)

Until next time,

Fiona T

 

Re-blog: The Happy PhD Zone: How To Maintain A Work-Life Balance In Academia – Next Scientist

I recently read this post over at Happy PhD zone, and it made me laugh, and think about my priorities at the moment too. I am trying to balance my time on weekends to make sure I recharge and spend time with my beautiful family. The PhD and a full time teaching load make for very busy week days. So, this blog is worth a look:)

The Happy PhD Zone: How To Maintain A Work-Life Balance In Academia – Next Scientist.

Until next time,

Fiona T

Re-Blog: 7 Smart Ways To Use Evernote For Research As A PhD – Next Scientist

OK- I still Love, Love, Love Evernote. It is one of my 3 technology saviours for my PhD and academic work (the other two are Dropbox and Mendeley) Here is a blog I read a while ago with some great tips for using Evernote to better organise your research. They had me very early on with the comparison to a ‘swiss army knife’… read on and enjoy:)

7 Smart Ways To Use Evernote For Research As A PhD – Next Scientist.

Until next time,

Fiona T

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 6) Review of Goldiblox and the spinning machine

Hi to all my followers- I’m sorry to say that I have neglected this blog for a little while. It has taken one of my new students this year to prompt me to write again, so I will try to write fortnightly posts about ICT study tools, games, toys and learning. Welcome back:)

Here is part 6 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

This week I am looking at “Goldi Blox” story/game that can support creativity and thinking through play. I had seen this in the stores a few times and wondered if it would be a suitable present. In a recent discussion with a colleague, I found that she had the story/game and used it as part of her teaching- so I asked to borrow it.

image

It comes with a story that takes you and your child through building the spinning machine- and is an introduction to belt drives, as an engineering concept. The aim is to make a machine that will spin all of the characters in the book- they are figurines in the box. There are also extra challenges in the book, to continue playing with.The book uses funny rhymes to engage the imagination too.

2015-03-20 16.48.07For the age range stated it is appropriate as a learning object.  I feel that adding just a few cogs and wheels as extra pieces here would serve as a strong extension to the belt drive ideas. This would open up a range of open ended play opportunities and begin to explore gear ratios to get the character figurines to spin at different speeds. I would probably purchase this for a 4 to 5 year old as a present.

There are other a few other games, like ‘mouse trap’ where machines are set up as part of the game, but this is the first one I have seen for a younger age group and with a story to accompany it. I wonder if you have seen any other such items available. If you have, please share them below in the comments:)

Until next time

Fiona T

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 5)

Here is part 5 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

This week I am looking at Lego (and similar building style toys, including mega blocks, mecanno, and even the digital space of minecraft) as a toy that can support creativity through play.

The photos above are from a game of  ‘Lego creationary’ (think: pictionary with lego). This game has players make particular items and the other players need to guess the item made – lots of creative fun, competition and open ended play. The other Lego games also encourage exploratory play – games like Heroica, Minotaur, and Lego city police all have starting points for game play and set up, and as you play them more you can adapt the game board and rules to change the challenge level.

Aside from the more recent Lego games, Lego itself is a great open ended play tool. It does come in sets, with instructions to build the item on the box, and then once this is done and played with, the real fun begins. Children (and yes, adults too) can work together to build infinite objects. Today this is classified as a ‘sandbox game/space’ – an opportunity for open ended play where the child can be in charge.  Mecanno is very similar, but uses tools, nuts and bolts  to build machines.  Minecraft is a digital space that now fits this definition  – for a review of this please see: http://appsforaussiekids.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/minecraft-for-parents-part-2-of.html .   After getting used to the controls in Minecraft you can play and build whatever you want.  Playing with any of these alongside and with your child can lead to lots of fun, and learning for both of you:) Setting challenges to ‘build’ – like building your house in Minecraft – can be interesting to collaborate on, as there are lots of problem solving opportunities that present themselves as you work though the challenge together.

So, what ‘sandbox games/spaces’ do you like? How else might you incorporate this style of game/toy to extend opportunities for develop thinking skills? Perhaps you would like to share a picture of your families collaboration in one of these spaces? Please share in the comments : )

Until next time

Fiona T

 

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Dropbox update – MyPaperless PhD

Just a quick post today-

After thinking that I wasn’t saving to dropbox properly at work, I found the real problem was not closing the windows/programs I was working with on my laptop. I was inadvertently overwriting the work I did at work when I would open my laptop later in the day. Dropbox, being uber efficient, was updating the files fine:) . I did find, by using opening my dropbox account on the web, that you can search previous versions of folders and files and re-instate the one you need- thanks dropbox.

I also recently upgraded my dropbox storage and began paying for this extra space- imagine my surprise when Dropbox announced last week they were upgrading all pro- storage to 1TB for no extra charge! Very happy with that:)

Until next time

Fiona T

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