Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 5)

Here is part 5 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

This week I am looking at Lego (and similar building style toys, including mega blocks, mecanno, and even the digital space of minecraft) as a toy that can support creativity through play.

The photos above are from a game of  ‘Lego creationary’ (think: pictionary with lego). This game has players make particular items and the other players need to guess the item made – lots of creative fun, competition and open ended play. The other Lego games also encourage exploratory play – games like Heroica, Minotaur, and Lego city police all have starting points for game play and set up, and as you play them more you can adapt the game board and rules to change the challenge level.

Aside from the more recent Lego games, Lego itself is a great open ended play tool. It does come in sets, with instructions to build the item on the box, and then once this is done and played with, the real fun begins. Children (and yes, adults too) can work together to build infinite objects. Today this is classified as a ‘sandbox game/space’ – an opportunity for open ended play where the child can be in charge.  Mecanno is very similar, but uses tools, nuts and bolts  to build machines.  Minecraft is a digital space that now fits this definition  – for a review of this please see: http://appsforaussiekids.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/minecraft-for-parents-part-2-of.html .   After getting used to the controls in Minecraft you can play and build whatever you want.  Playing with any of these alongside and with your child can lead to lots of fun, and learning for both of you 🙂 Setting challenges to ‘build’ – like building your house in Minecraft – can be interesting to collaborate on, as there are lots of problem solving opportunities that present themselves as you work though the challenge together.

So, what ‘sandbox games/spaces’ do you like? How else might you incorporate this style of game/toy to extend opportunities for develop thinking skills? Perhaps you would like to share a picture of your families collaboration in one of these spaces? Please share in the comments : )

Until next time

Fiona T

 

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

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Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 4)

Here is part 4 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

Puzzles of any sort are a great challenge for young and old alike. There are puzzles available for any developmental age group. The one pictured above is a mind bending adult puzzle…allegedly (according to the box) it has a number of solutions, however in reality I am yet to find one 🙂 . The challenge is in trying to solve these puzzles, and pushing your mind into creative and strategic modes it may not use otherwise. I don’t think I will find a solution to this puzzle. However, not all puzzles are like this, many have challenging, though achievable solutions.

Jigsaw puzzles are one such type of challenge. The picture/solution is on the box and whether there are 7 pieces or 1000, you can work towards reassembling the picture. The creativity used here will be in the strategy you use to find patterns… Do you pick up one random piece and try and match it to every other piece? Or are you matching shapes, colours, patterns or a range of all three? Do you find all of the edge pieces first and assemble these, then sort other pieces according to colour? Strategy and perseverance are important skills to develop. Leveling up here for adults is easy…there are now a range of 3D puzzles, and also puzzles that contain mysteries to solve within them. I even recall seeing a puzzle with 3 extra pieces!

For younger children the Jigsaws are often smaller,  and there are block puzzles (with different pictures on each side of a cube to match), or puzzles can be cut out shapes on a wooden board. Again,these support the same thinking skills and give children an opportunity to match shapes, colours and find patterns too. They also offer opportunities for hand-eye co-ordination and development of fine motor skills. As children get older, books with jigsaws in them may be an option. There is also the ‘spot what’ range where the puzzle can then be used along side a book to give the child clues.

Then we have word puzzles, and things like sudoku too, yes, I can already hear you thinking…more opportunities to find patterns and develop personal strategies 🙂 . Find-a-words and crosswords use elements of language and cryptic clues for us to ‘puzzle’ over.

Matching and strategy puzzles are also abundant on devices. Since Nintendo ‘game and watch’ in the 1980’s we have been able to have electronic puzzles in our pocket to play and challenge us anytime we want. The Gameboy (and similar)  bought games like Tetris, one of the first electronic puzzle games I played for months on end (getting to the top of the challenge levels and having the little men come out and dance…well it made all those hours worth it somehow 🙂 ) Smartphones and electronic devices grant us access to Apps like Bejewelled, Angry Birds, Where’s My Perry, Quest for Atlantis and my nemesis candy crush, all use puzzles as their main game play option.

So, what puzzles do you like? Have I missed your favourite puzzle type in my blog above? How else might you incorporate puzzles to extend opportunities for develop thinking skills?

Until next time

Fiona T

 

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 3)

Here is part 3 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.I was a bit surprised by this ‘bop it’ toy. I had often walked past it in stores and dismissed it as a present option for my nephews, as I had no idea what it was or did. Then, LT was given one as a present and I found out it is actually quite a fun toy and can contribute to both learning and thinking. There are several modes for ‘bop it’ to be used in; individual, pass and play for two or more people, or a two person challenge where you stand one person on each side of the toy. The aim in all these modes is basically the same: the ‘bop it’ toy calls out instructions, and you need to follow them by interacting with the toy. Vocal instructions are accompanied by sounds: “bop it’, ‘twist it”, ‘pull it’, ‘spin it’, or ‘flick it’. Sounds simple, right….wrong!  Instructions are called in different orders, making the thinking and co-ordination required to react quickly surprisingly challenging. As you are able to continue the sequence (we have gotten up to 20 right in a row) it unlocks levels. The different levels include things like the  spoken instruction being removed, leaving the sound to respond to. The next level again will call out colours instead of sounds.  All of these require fast reflexes to be able to stay in the game.

From an educational viewpoint, ‘bop it’ could be classified as a brain training toy. It develops quick thinking and coordination skills, reminding me of the cross marching exercises we use with students.  In terms of creativity, there isn’t much scope for free play with ‘bop it’, however I think it helps make connections within the brain and so would help children to ‘limber up’ towards creativity and reflexive thinking in other areas.

I wonder what other toys are out there that promote creativity, learning and thinking…please add any you think of in the comments below.

Until next time,

Fiona T

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic and have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 2)

Here is part 2 of a series of posts looking at commercially available* toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

We love stories in our house. These ‘story cubes’ are a great starter to help children (and adults) create their own stories. Inside this little box are 9 ‘story cubes’ with images that can be used as prompts for your own stories. As a toy it becomes a tool to promote creativity and challenge the story teller to think ‘outside the box’. There are opportunities to work together on a story, or to take turns in creating your own stories, based on the roll of the dice. The inside of the box has hints about different ways to ‘play’ with these cubes. We like to sit around the table and take 3 each, making up a story together. I must say here that WH (Wonderful Husband) lives up to his name during this game, and comes up with terrific tales, scintilating songs and rollicking rhymes, we try to get him to go last because LT (Little Tacker) and I often can’t stop laughing long enough to remember what we were going to say!

These blocks would make a good gift for a primary school aged child. However, if you wanted to make your own version you could draw or cut out pictures of various items and make your own paper cubes to stick them onto. Digital photos could also be used here, and would work as a language prompt for new items or words. This  could be extended for teachers to use in particular topics/themes, with pictures that will prompt students to discuss, explore, extend, and revise their ideas, through the creation of stories.

Do you play story or song based games with your children or family? Do you have a specific tool/toy (eg puppets, books or something else) that helps to structure this play? What are they, and what specific opportunities for creativity and thinking are available? Please share them in the comments below.

Until next time, happy playing!

Fiona T

*All opinions are my own, and are unsolicited. I personally purchase all items reviewed on this blog and have received no payment from any supplier for promoting their goods. I am a student/teacher/academic have no personal business affiliation or business motive on this blog. Opinions expressed are my own, and are not necessarily endorsed by my employer.

Games and toys that promote creativity and thinking (Part 1)

I have thought for a while now that I would like to write a series of posts looking at commercially available toys and games that can promote creativity and thinking in our kids, at home and at school. When I refer to creativity and thinking, I mean that children (and adults) have the opportunity to approach these toys in a variety of ways, not necessarily just the way described on the box. Creativity may involve changing rules, or allow a ‘free playing’ imaginative space for children to explore. Thinking, and expectations around thinking, will vary depending on the child and adult playing, for example it may be thinking about turn taking, sharing, language development, rule making or even just having a fun and relaxing space to talk in.

This week I want to start with some simple, easy to access items that can be used across age groups in a variety of ways. All three items this week would make welcome presents for children, as they can be used in so many ways for a number of years.

Wooden blocks (and indeed lego/megablocks/duplo etc) are a staple in most homes with young children present. I have hung onto these blocks given to LT when he was 1. They get brought out when we have little visitors, and often take a while to go back in the cupboard as LT, WH and I play with them again too. From tipping them onto the floor, building towers, cities and other things, to knocking down and counting back in the box,  play is all about developing co-ordination and imaginative play opportunities. We can use blocks to explore colours, shapes and counting with any age group. We can also use them for talking with children about building and balance (eg: How high can you build a tower on the carpet? On a solid surface? What happens when you put a semi circle shape in? How can we make a see-saw?), exploring movement with the semi-circle and cylinder shapes, or even drawing and talking about 3D shapes and fractions as children get bigger. Adults and children alike (from my observations) enjoy building and playing with these blocks, and the bonding moments through any play situation are priceless.

Playing cards are in most homes, and are cheap and easy to locate at $2 shops. We have many sets and have ‘played’ with these in varied ways depending on the age of the child we are playing with. Social skills, like sharing and turn taking can be practiced by playing concentration, matching games (numbers, colours, or shapes), snap and fish. Rule following and changing for these games also allow opportunities for children to take ownership of developing games and articulating differences they have applied to existing games. Again, the opportunity for developing language and bonds with others is a bonus of any type of game played. When I suggested this post on the facebook page, other uses of cards included building card houses (avoid plastic coated cards here as they can be too thin and slippery for this to progress vary far), and introducing the element of ‘luck’ into the games played, so that winning is not just reliant on skill or speed.  Games like ‘gin rummy’ and ‘solitaire’ offer older children and adults more complex rules, and the element of luck, to consider and respond to using a variety of strategic playing options. 

A commercial card game that can be fun at many ages is ‘Uno’, I have had the pack above since I was 10, and drove my family mad wanting to play it. The basic rules require strategy and memory (to shout ‘uno’ at the right time) to use the cards you are dealt, to win. When I was involved in teaching in a summer school program ‘Uno’ was played often with tutors and students in break times (using 2 packs of cards and up to 20 people playing at a time), but the rules were known as ‘summer school rules’, including changes like everyone passing their hand of cards to the left when a ‘draw four’ was put down…heaps of fun and lots of thinking/strategy/luck required too.

Do you have card games you like to play with children or family? What are they, and what specific opportunities for creativity and thinking are available? Please share them in the comments below.

Until next time, keep playing

Fiona T

Blood typing game-learning can be fun!

I love using games as an approach to learning. Here is one that has won awards, is free to play and can help you learn about blood types and transfusions. By using a context of an emergency ward, you can read the tutorial and then you are straight into collecting and analysing blood samples and choosing the right blood types for a transfusion for the patient. There are two versions, one is a quick play and the other is a mission. The quick play is good, while once you sign in to the mission it builds you up more clearly, and with a variety of patients. In the mission you also unlock achievements as you continue through. I quite like this game, especially when you save a patient, they give a positive ‘whoop’! There are even some funny achievements to unlock to lighten the mood. I am eager to use it with my class.

Here is a link to the game: http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/bloodtypinggame/

Until next week, happy playing. I wonder what games you like to use in your teaching?

Fiona T

Ethics, Gamification, Evernote, Multimodal learning….just another week really.

First I want to invite you all to join me in a ‘happy dance’…My institution approved my ethics application this week. As a PhD student in my first year I am having a ‘moment of clarity’, realising that this journey is a series of milestones and many learning ‘hurdles’, and after last weeks blog I feel more and more comfortable that I don’t know it all, and am allowing myself time to develop my ideas and skills.  This ethics journey has been a longer process than I anticipated, but has taught me much about myself and my study that I hadn’t considered before, and I feel that I am in a better position as I progress in my study.

I am also developing ideas about how I best present my work to different audiences. Being absorbed in my reading and study of gaming and gamification of education is wonderful, but I need to hone my skills in framing what I now know in a way that is accessible to a wider audience. I need to remember that not everyone has accompanied me on the reading journey. I can do this more easily with science concepts, but I developed that skill over a 15 year teaching career, while I have been a student in this area for a much shorter time. With that in mind, I am adding a ‘gamification’ tag to my blog, and will re-tag posts that address this topic and so that I can use my blog more effectively as a learning journal too.

I have a couple of students at the moment who are emailing me links, or sending things on twitter that they think are interesting and want to discuss. The first one I want to share might help to situate the ideas of ‘gamification’ in classrooms. It is a link to the gamification wiki: http://gamification.org/wiki/Gamification_of_Education, a place I had explored early on in my work, it is a good introduction to the main ideas, success and players in this exciting field.

The second one I want to share is a link to a blog on using Evernote with Kindergarten students:  http://www.coetail.asia/bsheridan/2012/09/10/kindergarten-students-help-to-build-evernote-e-portfolios-by-using-skitch/ .  I think that one of the main blockers to using technologies in classrooms is that teachers and students need to develop ideas of what using these technologies can look like for them. The kindergarten blog is one example of how new technologies can provide a number of benefits to students and teachers alike, and it is easy to fit into what already happens in classrooms.

The third link related to one of the topics we were exploring in our classes this week, multimodal learning. As a class we were thinking about meeting the specific needs of the range of learners in classrooms, so thought about various sites and tools we could access, that present media in a variety of ways. Things like:

  • The app ‘Show me’ that works like an interactive white board, allowing students to create and record presentations to share, and
  • Inanimate Alice that is an interactive multimodal story with clear support and links to the Australian Curriculum. This in particular provided some great discussion about how it could and shouldn’t be used in my students future classrooms. I had seen talked about on twitter, but not explored it. I see some good applications for this in a variety of settings.
  • The wiki: http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/, lots of tools for classroom use, categorised and listed for easy access.
  • A student sent me a link to this paper on multimodal learning from Ascilite 2010, Sankey, Birch and Gardiner article: Engaging students through multimodal learning environments: The journey continues. This article shares research linking students’ learning styles, their responses and perceived learning to particular multimodal stimuli in classroom activities.

So this week has been very busy, and I am glad I am on this learning journey.  Clearly my students are glad too as we are talking, sharing and re-shaping our ideas of what learning can look like. Please feel free to share blogs or sites that are helping you to re-shape your ideas of learning and possibilities of new technologies in our classrooms today.

Until next week

Fiona T

Leveling up in life….thinking about games.

I have been an official student for one month now. It has been a very busy month. Lots of seminars to help with organising things for study, including one on Endnote v15. This in particular was very interesting. It is a tool that will help manage all of my references and readings, and a tool that I hadn’t used previously for my study. I am looking forward to setting up my reference list so far, beginning to get the lit review swimming in my mind out onto ‘virtual paper’ in a new document.

I have also begun more focused reading on gaming theory. Jane McGonigal’s book “Reality is Broken” is an interesting read, and has sent me to visit and explore her blog and associated pages in more depth. This is a book written for everyone (ie: it is not an academic book), and while I am enjoying reading the multitude of examples of how life can be made more engaging and rewarding by turning many parts into games (Jane very clearly specifies the types of structures needed to make a rewarding game), there is part of me wondering if there is a need to turn EVERYTHING into a game. Then I have noticed in the last week that as humans we tend to build levels into most of our life endeavours, and while technically it is not a pure game, we are often setting goals and striving to improve our abilities in what we enjoy doing.

I play games everyday, on my phone, computer, and also more traditional games. These games have levels built in, we may also change the way we play them in order to win, or even to support a new player.

When I am not studying I am cooking or tatting (my craft addiction).  In the last week I have been looking at everything around me and noticing that while much of life is not really set up as a ‘game’…there are certainly levels of attainment in almost everything we do.

For example, this morning LT had his Taekwondo Grading, and received a second stripe on his purple belt. Every term or so the structure of this sport has a focus goal of leveling up.

In my cooking I think I am approx. intermediate level, I can make bread and ice-cream and do a pretty mean roast too. But I know meringues and some of the other more fancy techniques are beyond my time and patience at the moment.

In my craft I am edging beyond beginner and trying patterns that are a level higher than my previous attempts, perhaps adding beads or trying split rings or mock rings. I also like to go back to the simple patterns with just rings and chains and am noticing how much faster I am getting with these simpler patterns. Another sign of leveling up and mastery.

I can’t ignore the leveling up in my study too. Taking on this PhD hasn’t been a light undertaking. Those who have been following my blog since the beginning have witnessed the level of organisation needed for a Mum to make space for this new ‘level’ of working and thinking to take place. I have been building skills in my writing and reading too, developing papers worthy of conferences, corresponding with international committees and supporting my peers in skills we all need in order to collaborate and use our time more effectively.

So, thanks Jane for getting me thinking about games in real life. I think our current human nature in creating levels across what we do could make it easier for the more challenging aspects of life to become ‘game like’.

What levels do you notice around you?

Fiona T

Family fun: Civiliazation 5

We have had the Civilization game for approx 2 Weeks. WH and LT have been playing at any opportunity. LT is now insisting on giving me lessons in how to play (he might even let me touch the mouse soon! LOL).

The first game LT played was very much exploratory, with WH as the guide on the side, his advice being mostly ignored as LT clicked and traded and tried out different moves. In the last few days LT has come to understand many things, including that the map he uses has real cities on it (though many are in the wrong places), and that the people/leaders of the cities were real people. This has excited him so much. The other major excitement was when he leveled up to his first Golden Age, this jubilation involved many high fives and hugs. While I still have little understanding of what this achievement actually entails, I do know just from his reaction that it is a big deal. This has flowed on to him wanting me to play too, and he has set up a game for me and is patiently showing me how to play.

WH has also reflected on how LT is playing this game. He commented that LT is more likely to trade with others, than to attack and try to take their land. LT has also found some other menus and diagrams that help give different visions of the game and it’s goals, WH was very surprised as he hadn’t found them yet!

Much of LT’s self talk while he plays is gorgeous too…he chats to the characters eg: ‘that’s not very nice, he is attacking me’, ‘these little guys are going to make a farm’, ‘yay, we got animal husbandry’ and ‘we can trade with London and we are friends’. LT is also very conscious of ‘liberty’ and this is a value he encouraged me to pursue  from the beginning of ‘my’ game. I have also noticed that the reading skills he is developing at school are transferring to sounding out the names and cities he is unfamiliar with.

LT’s other great love is still ‘gamestar mechanic’, and he has leveled up and entered his first competition. While his work didn’t exactly take in to account all the competition criteria, he loved having the focused task and was again very proud of himself when he had finished his game and submitted it. He has rung and told relatives that he has ‘done his first entry’ and is still excited about it days later.

In terms of learning, there is a lot going on here. I am excited about the wider world knowledge that is being developed, and more than that the general approach to learning and life my son is showing. He is excited about being active in producing games to show others. He is eager to show and teach others what he has learned. He is not frustrated by ‘not knowing’ how to use something new, and will happily play and explore to figure out how he wants to use it. He has confidence in his ability to ‘figure out’ what he can and looks for help files and tutorials (and yes, you-tubes too). He will also ask for help from us when he needs it.

In terms of Gaming theory (my area of current reading) the games we are presenting to him have engaged him because they allow him these spaces to learn. He is exploring and achieving in increments, operating at his zone of proximal development and getting constant feedback on his progress. He plays because it is fun and rewarding, the effort he puts in is rewarded within the game space. Failure doesn’t really factor in to these games, there is a focus on doing it better next time, and not on winning and losing.

The mere fact that LT, who is 6, can play and achieve the goals set, show his learning across many different areas and teach and show others how to play and level up suggests to me that digital natives are more willing to explore, try new things and find ways to succeed, instead of giving up at the first obstacle.  These are definitely characteristics I want all of my students to develop.

Until next week,

Fiona T

Digital Games and Building: Gamestar Mechanic and Eden World builder

We are a bit of a ‘techno geek’ family. We love technology and gaming. We love to play, but all play games differently, WH is more about the score and winning, I just want to do the best I can in the time available (story of my life really!) and LT shows sides of us both (poor kid!). My study is around Games and Learning, and this week I have been focusing on ‘play’ in my reading. Coincidentally, around 10 days ago we accessed ‘Gamestar Mechanic‘ for the first time. LT (who is now 6) and I have been playing and working on this together, but it has been mostly driven by LT.

Very briefly, Gamestar mechanic is an online game that also teaches about the prinicples of game design, it is produced by The Institute of Play.  You can play for free (there is a premium paid version too), and while LT needs some help with the tricky end parts of the levels, he is getting much better at planning his strategy and moves. He has really loved building his own games and is eager to level up so he can unlock further features to build his games with. He can’t get enough of it, and in this short time has levelled up and has only 20% of the ‘game’ component left. He is excited about collecting the last few avatars and creating more games to share in the arcade. He has also written a little book to present to his class about Gamestar mechanic, he is so excited to share this amazing creative space.

Last night we downloaded a chicken ninja game for the android, and it was nice to be playing this with LT and pointing out the features of ‘good game design’ that built the game from level 1, like making clear goals, allowing replay of levels until mastery, slowly building up a number of different moves/skills to clear a level etc.  It also helped to solidify in my mind what I have known sub-conciously as a teacher for years: making explicit connection between different learning spaces helps students to understand and make these links for themselves. We need to teach students to look for the links in the world around them to help them make sense of life. Teaching is not a random process, it is planned and scaffolded by teachers to create meaningful opportunities for learning and understanding. It is this scaffolding that is done so clearly in Gamestar Mechanic, to make it a valuable online learning environment to help create savvy gamers. Here is a link to a You-tube about Katie Salen and the Quest 2 Learn school, where the entire curriculum is designed around game principles and scaffolding life long learners.

I had also been meaning to check out minecraft, as it has been recommended to me for a while now, so LT and I took some time to have a look at this through the week too. However I couldn’t find a free version of it, or a trial version for that matter,  so this was a short lived venture.

I was reminded this week by some students I work with about ‘Eden-World builder‘ for the i-pad. There is no online version/free version I could find, so we did pay 0.99c  for it for the i-pod. It allows you to build worlds, much like I envision minecraft to does (but I may be wrong…) LT has played with this a little too, and has so far built numerous TNT towers to explode! (boys will be boys…). We have yet to explore this in depth together, but I am excited by the possibilities.It will provide opportunities for us to explore forums and help features to learn about the ‘game’. It is a different space to work in to Gamestar Mechanic, and I’m sure we will have fun exploring how this work and talking about the different environments.

WH is excited about exploring the ‘Civilization‘ and seeing what this has to offer too, from our reading it is quite powerful for learning about history, politics and economics…so I’m sure you will hear about our adventures in a future blog!

What games/spaces for learning in the digital world do you use?

Until next week, may all your games be fun!

Fiona T

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